2 days — 7 venues — 46 bands

7pm/midnight Bastille, Paris

Café de la Danse, Badaboum, Mécanique Ondulatoire, La Loge, Café de la Presse, PopUp!, Supersonic

After launching in 2016, the Pitchfork Avant-Garde festival is back! On 31st October and 1st November, get ready for a nocturnal stroll around seven emblematic gig venues in the Bastille area: Café de la Danse, Badaboum, Mécanique Ondulatoire, la Loge, Café de la Presse, le PopUp! and Supersonic.

The perfect warm-up for the main event and with no less than 46 gigs to check out over two days, dot-to-dot your way around Paris’ 11th and 12th arrondissements discovering the new generation of indie music. Pitchfork Avant-Garde welcomes to the stage tomorrow’s musical treasures and emerging talent from both the French and international scenes. Fans of rock, pop, electro or R&B – take note!

(Sandy) Alex G

(Sandy) Alex G is the spearhead of the lo-fi bedroom-pop revival. Inspired by early masters of the genre (Roman Candle, Sabadoh III…), the young Philadelphian is an assiduous songwriter with spot-on lyrics who never stifles his emotional spontaneity. His latest album Rocket, may have seen a growth in production values, but there’s certainly no less candour.

Big Thief

With already two albums to their name, Big Thief will leave Brooklyn behind them as they come reveal their poetic vision of indie rock. Let yourself be taken in by this quartet’s kick-ass melodies, while singer Adrianne Lenker’s stirring, autobiographical lyrics are sure to hit you right in the heart.

Frankie Rose

Having made a name for herself in rock line-ups like Dum Dum Girls, Vivian Girls and Crystal Stills, multi-instrumentalist Frankie Rose is certainly well known across the pond in the post-punk and shoegaze scenes. Now she’s about to release her fourth solo album, which is sure to see her star rise.

K Á R Y Y N

American K Á R Y Y N is like a magician of sounds, her music a mirror image, full of character. And Björk (one of her inspirations) certainly wouldn’t disagree. Her sound is a mix of fragile vocals and electronic distortions. The effect? Like an arrow to the heart. Take “Aleppo”, a deeply moving homage to her childhood in Syria.

Obongjayar

With one foot in Nigeria, the other in London, the one thing linking the two is music. Or rather a unique mix of soul, downtempo hip-hop and ambient music that we’ve got Obongjayar to thank for. This 21st century-poet keeps an intriguingly low-profile, but when he performs, he sings then swings to spoken word, casting you over his spell.

Pinegrove

Pinegrove’s debut album drags around an adolescent angst reminiscent of the joyous early days of Wilco and Built to Spill. Hailing from New Jersey and lead by Evan Stephens Hall’s disillusioned, no-frills vocals, the DIY-quartet’s melodies seem to have taken inspiration directly from your high school diary.

Puma Blue

Jacob Allen, alias Puma Blue, blends the musical influences he grew up on into his sound. The result? A hybrid jazz with guitars and a throbbing groove that lend a beautiful backdrop for the Londoner’s soulful vocals to blossom and grow. Simply beautiful.

Sorry

Formerly known as Fish, this young grungy group straight out of London have renamed themselves Sorry for the release of their single “Drag King”. It’s a falsely nonchalant anthem that grinds away, depicting singer-guitarist Asha Lorenz’s desire to be a boy so she can dress up in drag. Take note and follow closely!

Wovoka Gentle

Wovoka Gentle’s sound shifts across the spectrum from folk to electro, then to experimental, without forgetting their pop roots. In their constant search for the perfect harmony, the London trio made up of Ellie, Imogen and William, bring to the stage their staggeringly beautiful musical arrangements.

Yellow Days

Hiding behind Yellow Days is 17-year-old George Van Den Broek. Growing up in the English countryside, you’d think he’d fallen in a pot of bubbling soul as a boy. His bittersweet, delicate pop is like a late summer’s night at the beach around a campfire and you see your crush kissing someone else: a warm yet sombre atmosphere.

You Man

When Alpage Records stablemates You Man take control of the stage, the mercury rises. Their 2016 debut, Spectrum of Love, is an ode to partying. The album full of techno-inflected, groovy house may make us lose all sense of time, but the rhythm sure ain’t lost.

You Man

When Alpage Records stablemates You Man take control of the stage, the mercury rises. Their 2016 debut, Spectrum of Love, is an ode to partying. The album full of techno-inflected, groovy house may make us lose all sense of time, but the rhythm sure ain’t lost.

Yellow Days

Hiding behind Yellow Days is 17-year-old George Van Den Broek. Growing up in the English countryside, you’d think he’d fallen in a pot of bubbling soul as a boy. His bittersweet, delicate pop is like a late summer’s night at the beach around a campfire and you see your crush kissing someone else: a warm yet sombre atmosphere.

Wovoka Gentle

Wovoka Gentle’s sound shifts across the spectrum from folk to electro, then to experimental, without forgetting their pop roots. In their constant search for the perfect harmony, the London trio made up of Ellie, Imogen and William, bring to the stage their staggeringly beautiful musical arrangements.

Sorry

Formerly known as Fish, this young grungy group straight out of London have renamed themselves Sorry for the release of their single “Drag King”. It’s a falsely nonchalant anthem that grinds away, depicting singer-guitarist Asha Lorenz’s desire to be a boy so she can dress up in drag. Take note and follow closely!

Puma Blue

Jacob Allen, alias Puma Blue, blends the musical influences he grew up on into his sound. The result? A hybrid jazz with guitars and a throbbing groove that lend a beautiful backdrop for the Londoner’s soulful vocals to blossom and grow. Simply beautiful.

Pinegrove

Pinegrove’s debut album drags around an adolescent angst reminiscent of the joyous early days of Wilco and Built to Spill. Hailing from New Jersey and lead by Evan Stephens Hall’s disillusioned, no-frills vocals, the DIY-quartet’s melodies seem to have taken inspiration directly from your high school diary.

Obongjayar

With one foot in Nigeria, the other in London, the one thing linking the two is music. Or rather a unique mix of soul, downtempo hip-hop and ambient music that we’ve got Obongjayar to thank for. This 21st century-poet keeps an intriguingly low-profile, but when he performs, he sings then swings to spoken word, casting you over his spell.

Noga Erez

She’s one of the latest gems to come out of the hothouse of talent that is Tel Aviv. At only 27, Noga Erez raps a rebellious flow of politically-charged messages over stripped-back, metallic beats. An explosive experience that under no circumstances is to be missed live.

K Á R Y Y N

American K Á R Y Y N is like a magician of sounds, her music a mirror image, full of character. And Björk (one of her inspirations) certainly wouldn’t disagree. Her sound is a mix of fragile vocals and electronic distortions. The effect? Like an arrow to the heart. Take “Aleppo”, a deeply moving homage to her childhood in Syria.

Frankie Rose

Having made a name for herself in rock line-ups like Dum Dum Girls, Vivian Girls and Crystal Stills, multi-instrumentalist Frankie Rose is certainly well known across the pond in the post-punk and shoegaze scenes. Now she’s about to release her fourth solo album, which is sure to see her star rise.

Big Thief

With already two albums to their name, Big Thief will leave Brooklyn behind them as they come reveal their poetic vision of indie rock. Let yourself be taken in by this quartet’s kick-ass melodies, while singer Adrianne Lenker’s stirring, autobiographical lyrics are sure to hit you right in the heart.

(Sandy) Alex G

(Sandy) Alex G is the spearhead of the lo-fi bedroom-pop revival. Inspired by early masters of the genre (Roman Candle, Sabadoh III…), the young Philadelphian is an assiduous songwriter with spot-on lyrics who never stifles his emotional spontaneity. His latest album Rocket, may have seen a growth in production values, but there’s certainly no less candour.

A2

A storm is looming, and it’s called A2. He may be better known across the Atlantic, but over here the discrete artist with a dark and heavy flow is shrouded in mystery. Signed to Disturbing London, with songs like Holograms and Outer Limits (ft. Serine Karthage), he’s sure sitting pretty in the game.

A2

A storm is looming, and it’s called A2. He may be better known across the Atlantic, but over here the discrete artist with a dark and heavy flow is shrouded in mystery. Signed to Disturbing London, with songs like Holograms and Outer Limits (ft. Serine Karthage), he’s sure sitting pretty in the game.

Jamila Woods

Known for her collaborations with Chance The Rapper and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Jamila Woods is much more than some featuring artist. On her first album, HEAVN, the Chicago native poet and activist bowls us over with her powerful, celestial lyrics and melodies that’ll shake your soul.

Julie Byrne

There’s something so simple about Julia Byrne’s folk music that instantly grabs your ears’ attention. And if that’s not enough, her stage presence, her delicate voice, her sheer concentration – eyes fixed on the fret of her guitar or firmly shut in the moment, her movements and her serenity all simply add to the charm. One wish: for her gigs to never end.

Matt Maltese

The art of a crescendo over simple, intimate melodies sure is Matt Maltese’s signature sound. He may describe universal emotions and feelings, but this twentysomething Londoner sure knows how to put them into words and music like nobody else. We’re left hanging on every note of his hauntingly deep voice expelled from his crooked smile.

Noga Erez

She’s one of the latest gems to come out of the hothouse of talent that is Tel Aviv. At only 27, Noga Erez raps a rebellious flow of politically-charged messages over stripped-back, metallic beats. An explosive experience that under no circumstances is to be missed live.

Nick Hakim

Nick Hakim made his voice heard in 2014 with two self-produced EPs full of spleen and a contagious melancholy. This year, he’s back with his debut album, Green Twins, and the Brooklyn prodigy has done a fine job in proving himself to be a soul revelation and a lyricist not to be overlooked.

RAY BLK

Hailing from Catford in South London, Ray BLK may not yet have released an album, but she’s certainly established herself as the artist with the most serious claim to the international R&B throne. Racking up a list of prestigious collaborations (Stormzy, Gorillaz), Ray BLK is without a doubt, one to watch.

Savoy Motel

A retro 70s look, funky guitars and a heady groove, the merry Nashville quartet have been bashing out refreshingly spontaneous and clever lo-fi hits for little over a year now. Bassist frontman Jeffrey Novak is one of a kind, and he’s leading Savoy Motel in the revival with one eye to the future.

Soleil Vert

Fresh on the French pop music scene, the mysterious Soleil Vert are full of intrigue and seduction. Their aptly-named first single “Souvenir” is a cool, nostalgia-filled ballad that’s heady to the max and featuring guest vocals from Mina Tindle. This Parisian trio’s first EP is sure to be promising and certainly won’t leave you cold.

Triplego

Triplego are bringing rap 3.0 to the scene. With their sticky flow and soft productions, their innovative compositions are fresh and unique. Hailing from Montreuil, over the space of three projects Sanguee and Momo Spazz never stop standing out from the crowd. And once again, they’re looking to the future with their latest mixtape, 2020. This duo is always one step ahead of the game.

Vagabon

Originally from Cameroon but now based in New York, Laetitia Tamko has seduced the world over with Cold Apartment, a compelling yet touching indie-rock “instant classic” that sounds right out of the 90s. She writes lo-fi pop that’s raw and refined, shaky and light, lively and melancholic – the immediate successor to Helium or Built to Spill.

White Reaper

If you’re wondering whether White Reaper really is “the best American band in the world” (so claims their second album), why not come make your mind up for yourself? These Kentucky natives are certainly up for it and will try and live up to their reputation of badass rockers with the aid of supercharged guitar riffs.

White Reaper

If you’re wondering whether White Reaper really is “the best American band in the world” (so claims their second album), why not come make your mind up for yourself? These Kentucky natives are certainly up for it and will try and live up to their reputation of badass rockers with the aid of supercharged guitar riffs.

Vagabon

Originally from Cameroon but now based in New York, Laetitia Tamko has seduced the world over with Cold Apartment, a compelling yet touching indie-rock “instant classic” that sounds right out of the 90s. She writes lo-fi pop that’s raw and refined, shaky and light, lively and melancholic – the immediate successor to Helium or Built to Spill.

Triplego

Triplego are bringing rap 3.0 to the scene. With their sticky flow and soft productions, their innovative compositions are fresh and unique. Hailing from Montreuil, over the space of three projects Sanguee and Momo Spazz never stop standing out from the crowd. And once again, they’re looking to the future with their latest mixtape, 2020. This duo is always one step ahead of the game.

Soleil Vert

Fresh on the French pop music scene, the mysterious Soleil Vert are full of intrigue and seduction. Their aptly-named first single “Souvenir” is a cool, nostalgia-filled ballad that’s heady to the max and featuring guest vocals from Mina Tindle. This Parisian trio’s first EP is sure to be promising and certainly won’t leave you cold.

Savoy Motel

A retro 70s look, funky guitars and a heady groove, the merry Nashville quartet have been bashing out refreshingly spontaneous and clever lo-fi hits for little over a year now. Bassist frontman Jeffrey Novak is one of a kind, and he’s leading Savoy Motel in the revival with one eye to the future.

Ray BLK

Hailing from Catford in South London, Ray BLK may not yet have released an album, but she’s certainly established herself as the artist with the most serious claim to the international R&B throne. Racking up a list of prestigious collaborations (Stormzy, Gorillaz), Ray BLK is without a doubt, one to watch.

Nick Hakim

Nick Hakim made his voice heard in 2014 with two self-produced EPs full of spleen and a contagious melancholy. This year, he’s back with his debut album, Green Twins, and the Brooklyn prodigy has done a fine job in proving himself to be a soul revelation and a lyricist not to be overlooked.

Matt Maltese

The art of a crescendo over simple, intimate melodies sure is Matt Maltese’s signature sound. He may describe universal emotions and feelings, but this twentysomething Londoner sure knows how to put them into words and music like nobody else. We’re left hanging on every note of his hauntingly deep voice expelled from his crooked smile.

Julie Byrne

There’s something so simple about Julia Byrne’s folk music that instantly grabs your ears’ attention. And if that’s not enough, her stage presence, her delicate voice, her sheer concentration – eyes fixed on the fret of her guitar or firmly shut in the moment, her movements and her serenity all simply add to the charm. One wish: for her gigs to never end.

Jamilla Woods

Known for her collaborations with Chance The Rapper and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Jamila Woods is much more than some featuring artist. On her first album, HEAVN, the Chicago native poet and activist bowls us over with her powerful, celestial lyrics and melodies that’ll shake your soul.

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